untitled.
untitled.
+
goodales:

Koa Smith - Canon A-1 35mm
+
highenoughtoseethesea:

Conner
Photo: Struntz
+
morganmaassen:

Surfer babe extraordinaire Laura Enever.
+
highenoughtoseethesea:

Ethan Zane, Santa Cruz
Photo: Gyselinck
+
surf4living:

fly brenno, fly
ph: hornby
+
+
dea-del-mare:

x
+
mahalojack:

Jack Johnson in NYC 2007
photo: Don Van Cleave
+
colstal:

v╳c
+
highenoughtoseethesea:

2011 Follow the Light winner Duncan Macfarlane is one of surf photography’s sharpest young guns.  His work is regularly featured in the industry’s most renowned publications, and he is internationally recognized as a master of his craft.  Roaming the globe to capture imagery, Duncan maintains a passion for both shooting and surfing, and places an emphasis on good vibes as a way of life.  Have a look at our interview below, and check out the links following the Q&A if you feel like having your mind blown by his portfolio.

…………………


How long have you been into photography?
I’ve been shooting photos for a good 6 years or more, but probably 4 professionally. It was a gradual process of enjoying taking photos of friends, to shooting more and more, until I began to capture things I thought were worth submitting to magazines and it grew from there. 
 
What was the first camera you bought yourself? Do you still have it? 
I think the first camera I bought was a Nikonos V… I still have it definitely, it’s in the cupboard next to me. Unfortunately, that was back when knew nothing about nothing about photography, and water photography especially. Nikonos cameras are fully waterproof cameras themselves. And I didn’t understand how seals and how to keep it properly maintained and water tight and it flooded one day. It’s just a shell now, the entire insides have rusted out. Such a shame because they are such awesome cameras.
 
Do you surf? 
Do I surf!  Of course I surf! I think you have to in order to do surf photography.  It’s easier to understand, read and interpret when you understand what you’re shooting.
 
What’s your home break?
I surf at home a lot in between trips in Sawtell, in NSW, Oz. 
 
Have you ever surfed competitively?
I didn’t surf competitively in any professional manner, but I did win hte B grade title at the local board riders back in the day.
 
When did you decide to make surf photography your career?  How did you make it happen?
After high school I worked for about a year saving up all my money and bought gear and paid for travel the following year. I intended to do university but was in no rush and didn’t know what I wanted to do, not knowing whether I could make a living from photography. I spent a year doing a host of different travel, met some rad people who took me in and helped me out and I shot lots of photos. From that I got an odd photo run in print and slowly got more exposure… I didn’t go out and expect to make a living straight away, and I think if I did I would have given up quickly because it’s always a slow process.  But I started early so it’s paying off now, I think.  I entered a few surf photography specific contests like Follow the Light Foundation and Little Weeds when that was running, which also helped my profile. I ended up going to university for 2 weeks and I was getting small jobs here and there for photography and decided to drop out then and there and pursue this.
 
Tell me about a photo you will never forget taking.  
I think for me, at the moment, it’d be the Joel Parkinson World Title image. Him double fist-pumping after he won the Pipe Masters and the World Title. It’s one of those moments in history which I think I’ll appreciate more and more as time goes on.
 
What would be the “Shot of a Lifetime” for you right now? 
Shot of a lifetime. I have a few ideas that I want to do that would be pretty epic but I won’t share just yet. But I also think those shots of a lifetime usually happen in the moment and I won’t be able to foresee them, just I hope I have my camera ready to shoot. 
 
What makes surf photography an amazing way to make a living?
Travel.  Meet heaps of rad people.  Surf.  Drink beers and swim in the ocean for a living. I haven’t worked a day in my life.
 
What makes your job difficult?
(Being) away from my wife and home a lot. Doing my taxes with a million different currency receipts. Camera gear expenses.
 
What is your favorite WCT stop and why?  
Well, I’m answering this a day after the J-Bay stop just happened and it was best ever, so right now, J-Bay. Whenever the waves are good, I’m stoked.  I love the contests. 
 
What is the most incredible experience you have had in the water so far this year?
In the water? Me getting super barreled while surfing by myself at home.
 
Where is somewhere you would love to go to shoot but haven’t yet?
Morocco. Easily, Morocco. 
 
What inspires you? 
I don’t know. I’m temperamental. I change my mind constantly and one thing I like today, I won’t tomorrow. But I think people with great attitudes who bring a lot of happiness to my world inspire me.
 
What advice would you give to aspiring photographers?
Shoot lots. Work hard. Being happy and having a good attitude is really important. Shoot water.  Don’t be discouraged by rejection. Value your work and don’t give it away for peanuts. Take any door that is opened to you; you don’t know where it will lead.  And be nice to everyone - you never know how far that last one can get you or what obscure connections can be made in this world. 

…………………

http://duncanmacfarlane.wix.com/duncanmac
http://www.surfingmagazine.com/tag/duncan-macfarlane/
http://instagram.com/duncanm
highenoughtoseethesea:

2011 Follow the Light winner Duncan Macfarlane is one of surf photography’s sharpest young guns.  His work is regularly featured in the industry’s most renowned publications, and he is internationally recognized as a master of his craft.  Roaming the globe to capture imagery, Duncan maintains a passion for both shooting and surfing, and places an emphasis on good vibes as a way of life.  Have a look at our interview below, and check out the links following the Q&A if you feel like having your mind blown by his portfolio.

…………………


How long have you been into photography?
I’ve been shooting photos for a good 6 years or more, but probably 4 professionally. It was a gradual process of enjoying taking photos of friends, to shooting more and more, until I began to capture things I thought were worth submitting to magazines and it grew from there. 
 
What was the first camera you bought yourself? Do you still have it? 
I think the first camera I bought was a Nikonos V… I still have it definitely, it’s in the cupboard next to me. Unfortunately, that was back when knew nothing about nothing about photography, and water photography especially. Nikonos cameras are fully waterproof cameras themselves. And I didn’t understand how seals and how to keep it properly maintained and water tight and it flooded one day. It’s just a shell now, the entire insides have rusted out. Such a shame because they are such awesome cameras.
 
Do you surf? 
Do I surf!  Of course I surf! I think you have to in order to do surf photography.  It’s easier to understand, read and interpret when you understand what you’re shooting.
 
What’s your home break?
I surf at home a lot in between trips in Sawtell, in NSW, Oz. 
 
Have you ever surfed competitively?
I didn’t surf competitively in any professional manner, but I did win hte B grade title at the local board riders back in the day.
 
When did you decide to make surf photography your career?  How did you make it happen?
After high school I worked for about a year saving up all my money and bought gear and paid for travel the following year. I intended to do university but was in no rush and didn’t know what I wanted to do, not knowing whether I could make a living from photography. I spent a year doing a host of different travel, met some rad people who took me in and helped me out and I shot lots of photos. From that I got an odd photo run in print and slowly got more exposure… I didn’t go out and expect to make a living straight away, and I think if I did I would have given up quickly because it’s always a slow process.  But I started early so it’s paying off now, I think.  I entered a few surf photography specific contests like Follow the Light Foundation and Little Weeds when that was running, which also helped my profile. I ended up going to university for 2 weeks and I was getting small jobs here and there for photography and decided to drop out then and there and pursue this.
 
Tell me about a photo you will never forget taking.  
I think for me, at the moment, it’d be the Joel Parkinson World Title image. Him double fist-pumping after he won the Pipe Masters and the World Title. It’s one of those moments in history which I think I’ll appreciate more and more as time goes on.
 
What would be the “Shot of a Lifetime” for you right now? 
Shot of a lifetime. I have a few ideas that I want to do that would be pretty epic but I won’t share just yet. But I also think those shots of a lifetime usually happen in the moment and I won’t be able to foresee them, just I hope I have my camera ready to shoot. 
 
What makes surf photography an amazing way to make a living?
Travel.  Meet heaps of rad people.  Surf.  Drink beers and swim in the ocean for a living. I haven’t worked a day in my life.
 
What makes your job difficult?
(Being) away from my wife and home a lot. Doing my taxes with a million different currency receipts. Camera gear expenses.
 
What is your favorite WCT stop and why?  
Well, I’m answering this a day after the J-Bay stop just happened and it was best ever, so right now, J-Bay. Whenever the waves are good, I’m stoked.  I love the contests. 
 
What is the most incredible experience you have had in the water so far this year?
In the water? Me getting super barreled while surfing by myself at home.
 
Where is somewhere you would love to go to shoot but haven’t yet?
Morocco. Easily, Morocco. 
 
What inspires you? 
I don’t know. I’m temperamental. I change my mind constantly and one thing I like today, I won’t tomorrow. But I think people with great attitudes who bring a lot of happiness to my world inspire me.
 
What advice would you give to aspiring photographers?
Shoot lots. Work hard. Being happy and having a good attitude is really important. Shoot water.  Don’t be discouraged by rejection. Value your work and don’t give it away for peanuts. Take any door that is opened to you; you don’t know where it will lead.  And be nice to everyone - you never know how far that last one can get you or what obscure connections can be made in this world. 

…………………

http://duncanmacfarlane.wix.com/duncanmac
http://www.surfingmagazine.com/tag/duncan-macfarlane/
http://instagram.com/duncanm
highenoughtoseethesea:

2011 Follow the Light winner Duncan Macfarlane is one of surf photography’s sharpest young guns.  His work is regularly featured in the industry’s most renowned publications, and he is internationally recognized as a master of his craft.  Roaming the globe to capture imagery, Duncan maintains a passion for both shooting and surfing, and places an emphasis on good vibes as a way of life.  Have a look at our interview below, and check out the links following the Q&A if you feel like having your mind blown by his portfolio.

…………………


How long have you been into photography?
I’ve been shooting photos for a good 6 years or more, but probably 4 professionally. It was a gradual process of enjoying taking photos of friends, to shooting more and more, until I began to capture things I thought were worth submitting to magazines and it grew from there. 
 
What was the first camera you bought yourself? Do you still have it? 
I think the first camera I bought was a Nikonos V… I still have it definitely, it’s in the cupboard next to me. Unfortunately, that was back when knew nothing about nothing about photography, and water photography especially. Nikonos cameras are fully waterproof cameras themselves. And I didn’t understand how seals and how to keep it properly maintained and water tight and it flooded one day. It’s just a shell now, the entire insides have rusted out. Such a shame because they are such awesome cameras.
 
Do you surf? 
Do I surf!  Of course I surf! I think you have to in order to do surf photography.  It’s easier to understand, read and interpret when you understand what you’re shooting.
 
What’s your home break?
I surf at home a lot in between trips in Sawtell, in NSW, Oz. 
 
Have you ever surfed competitively?
I didn’t surf competitively in any professional manner, but I did win hte B grade title at the local board riders back in the day.
 
When did you decide to make surf photography your career?  How did you make it happen?
After high school I worked for about a year saving up all my money and bought gear and paid for travel the following year. I intended to do university but was in no rush and didn’t know what I wanted to do, not knowing whether I could make a living from photography. I spent a year doing a host of different travel, met some rad people who took me in and helped me out and I shot lots of photos. From that I got an odd photo run in print and slowly got more exposure… I didn’t go out and expect to make a living straight away, and I think if I did I would have given up quickly because it’s always a slow process.  But I started early so it’s paying off now, I think.  I entered a few surf photography specific contests like Follow the Light Foundation and Little Weeds when that was running, which also helped my profile. I ended up going to university for 2 weeks and I was getting small jobs here and there for photography and decided to drop out then and there and pursue this.
 
Tell me about a photo you will never forget taking.  
I think for me, at the moment, it’d be the Joel Parkinson World Title image. Him double fist-pumping after he won the Pipe Masters and the World Title. It’s one of those moments in history which I think I’ll appreciate more and more as time goes on.
 
What would be the “Shot of a Lifetime” for you right now? 
Shot of a lifetime. I have a few ideas that I want to do that would be pretty epic but I won’t share just yet. But I also think those shots of a lifetime usually happen in the moment and I won’t be able to foresee them, just I hope I have my camera ready to shoot. 
 
What makes surf photography an amazing way to make a living?
Travel.  Meet heaps of rad people.  Surf.  Drink beers and swim in the ocean for a living. I haven’t worked a day in my life.
 
What makes your job difficult?
(Being) away from my wife and home a lot. Doing my taxes with a million different currency receipts. Camera gear expenses.
 
What is your favorite WCT stop and why?  
Well, I’m answering this a day after the J-Bay stop just happened and it was best ever, so right now, J-Bay. Whenever the waves are good, I’m stoked.  I love the contests. 
 
What is the most incredible experience you have had in the water so far this year?
In the water? Me getting super barreled while surfing by myself at home.
 
Where is somewhere you would love to go to shoot but haven’t yet?
Morocco. Easily, Morocco. 
 
What inspires you? 
I don’t know. I’m temperamental. I change my mind constantly and one thing I like today, I won’t tomorrow. But I think people with great attitudes who bring a lot of happiness to my world inspire me.
 
What advice would you give to aspiring photographers?
Shoot lots. Work hard. Being happy and having a good attitude is really important. Shoot water.  Don’t be discouraged by rejection. Value your work and don’t give it away for peanuts. Take any door that is opened to you; you don’t know where it will lead.  And be nice to everyone - you never know how far that last one can get you or what obscure connections can be made in this world. 

…………………

http://duncanmacfarlane.wix.com/duncanmac
http://www.surfingmagazine.com/tag/duncan-macfarlane/
http://instagram.com/duncanm